COVID-19

COVID-19 is a disease that can affect your lungs, airways and other organs. Find out the best ways to help your children, family/whānau and yourself in this pandemic.

Boy with a virus blowing his nose into a tissue

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Copyright: Jean-Paul Chassenet

Graphic with text 'How does the Pfizer vaccine work' and vaccine

The Immunisation Advisory Centre have created a short video answering the most common questions about the COVID-19 vaccine: How does it work? They hope this information can help to inform you and your whānau ahead of getting the vaccine so together we can stand strong against COVID-19 in Aotearoa.

Graphic with text 'How does the Pfizer vaccine work' and vaccine

The Immunisation Advisory Centre have created a short video in Samoan answering the most common questions about the COVID-19 vaccine: How does it work? They hope this information can help to inform you and your whānau ahead of getting the vaccine so together we can stand strong against COVID-19 in Aotearoa.

Graphic with text 'How does the Pfizer vaccine work' and vaccine

Watch a short video in te Reo Māori answering the most common questions about the COVID-19 vaccine.

Screenshot from a video of a young man talking to screen

Find out why it's important for your child 12 and over to have the COVID vaccine. It's especially important for those with underlying health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart conditions (like rheumatic heart disease). Watch the videos. Make a booking now.

Cover of pamphlet - graphic of 2 young people

Anyone 12 years and over can now have the COVID vaccine. Check some information aimed at teenagers in the 12 to 15 age group.

Boy with a virus blowing his nose into a tissue

COVID-19 is a disease caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. It can affect your lungs, airways and other organs. If your child or you have cold, flu or COVID-19 symptoms, call your GP or Healthline on 0800 358 5453 for advice. 

Hands being washed under a tap

New Zealand now has community cases of COVID-19. Follow the rules for the current Alert Level. If your child or you have cold, flu or COVID-19 symptoms, call your GP or Healthline on 0800 358 5453 for advice.

Photo of someone wearing a mask

Wearing a mask or face covering can reduce the risk of people who have COVID-19 spreading the virus to others. A mask or face covering can help stop infectious droplets spreading when a person speaks, laughs, coughs or sneezes. See how to make your mask more efficient. 

Graphic of COVID-19 symptoms

How to recognise possible symptoms of the Alpha variant of COVID-19. If you or your child have cold, flu or COVID-19 symptoms, stay home and call your doctor or Healthline on 0800 358 5453 for advice about getting a free test.

Immunisation remains a priority for whānau during all COVID-19 alert levels. You can  protect your child against serious diseases like whooping cough and measles. 

Photo of baby breastfeeding

If you're breastfeeding and haven't had the COVID-19 vaccine already, you can make a booking now. There are no safety concerns about getting the COVID-19 vaccine if you're breastfeeding.

Young people with diabetes aged 12 years and over can have their COVID-19 immunisation now. When parents or caregivers make their own appointments, they can also make appointments for their children aged 12 and over. That means children can have their immunisation at the same time as their parents or caregivers.

Little child, boy, hugging his mother and a teddy bear

It is perfectly normal and OK to feel anxiety in the current COVID-19 pandemic. This can result in strong feelings, reactions, and changes in behaviour. There are a number of steps you can take to help your children, family/whānau and yourself.

A page from an online book - animated children standing in a line and holding on to a cord

Looking for something to help your child make sense of  COVID-19? Check these resources - from videos for kids about the science behind coronavirus to online stories that can be important conversation starters in your household. The resources cover the range of Alert Levels in New Zealand. 

Mother with newborn baby

If you are pregnant or caring for a newborn baby, it's natural that you may be feeling increased anxiety and distress while New Zealand is working to stop the spread of COVID-19. Find out what you can do to help keep you and your baby safe. Find out what you can expect from your maternity care while you are pregnant and following the birth of your baby during Alert Level 1.

Mother with newborn baby

If you are pregnant or caring for a newborn baby, it's natural that you may be feeling increased anxiety and distress while New Zealand is working to stop the spread of COVID-19. Find out what you can do to help keep you and your baby safe. Find out what you can expect from your maternity care while you are pregnant and following the birth of your baby during Alert Level 2.

Mother with newborn baby

If you are pregnant or caring for a newborn baby, it's natural that you may be feeling increased anxiety and distress while New Zealand is working to stop the spread of COVID-19. Find out what you can do to help keep you and your baby safe. Find out what you can expect from your maternity care while you are pregnant and following the birth of your baby during Alert Level 3.

Mother with newborn baby

If you are pregnant or caring for a newborn baby, it's natural that you may be feeling increased anxiety and distress while New Zealand is working to stop the spread of COVID-19. Find out what you can do to help keep you and your baby safe. Find out what you can expect from your maternity care while you are pregnant and following the birth of your baby during Alert Level 4.

Baby breastfeeding

If you have COVID-19, you can still breastfeed your baby. So far, there is no evidence of mothers passing on COVID-19 to babies through breastmilk. The main risk of breastfeeding is close contact between you and your baby. So, take precautions if you are breastfeeding and you have COVID-19.

School bag on a bench with notebook and calculator alongside

The NZ Clinical Network for Children and Young People with Diabetes advises that it is safe for children and young people with diabetes to be at school under Alert Levels 1 or 2.

Boy sitting at a desk looking at his work with a teacher looking on

The Australian and NZ Children's Haematology and Oncology Group advises it is safe for all siblings and the vast majority of childhood cancer and bone marrow transplant patients to be at school when schools are open (at Alert Levels 1 and 2).

Mother and daughter hugging

It can be a frightening and confusing time for children when a family member dies. The restrictions due to COVID-19 make it more challenging to meet the needs of children, particularly when a family member dies from COVID-19 infection. Find out how you can create new opportunities to help your child in this process.

A Mayo Clinic (USA) video which prepares children for a COVID-19 nasal swab test and helps ease some of their possible fear and anxiety. This video is suitable for children as young as 4 years old.